The Bhutan-Wiki Project: Global knowledge and minority languages

Thursday September 17, 3pm – 4.30pm

Online via Zoom, RSVP via Eventbrite to receive Meeting ID and password

The growing influence of English Wikipedia has created powerful new gatekeepers and publishing practices that determine not only what constitutes knowledge in the online world, but whose knowledge is privileged. Research shows the different ways that the structural inequalities of the offline world are being reproduced online, creating new sites for colonisation. However, the smaller language Wikipedias offer a bulwark for cultural resilience. The platform has multi-media capabilities, which can be utilized by oral cultures in ways not possible before Web 2.0 technologies. as well as providing asynchronous online meeting places for geographically disparate communities to participate in their national imaginings. This paper presents preliminary work on a three-year, Australian Research Council-funded action research project that will investigate the experiences of the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan with English and Dzongkha Wikipedias as a case study to consider 1) some of the impacts of English Wikipedia on global knowledge equity and 2) the potential for minority language Wikipedias to provide a cultural counterpoint.

Dr Bunty Avieson is an author, journalist and academic, who teaches in the Department of Media and Communications at University of Sydney. Her research interests include the media in Bhutan, literary journalism and Wikipedia Studies. These threads are brought together in this DECRA project, awarded in 2019.

Media@Sydney Seminars, Semester 2, 2020

Please RSVP through event links to receive Zoom meeting ID and password

Thursday September 17, 3pm – 4.30pm

Bunty Avieson (University of Sydney)

The Bhutan-Wiki Project: Global knowledge and minority languages

Wikipedia offers a bulwark for cultural resilience by oral cultures and this project investigates the experiences of the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan.

Thursday October 8, 3pm – 4.30pm

Mark Johnson (University of Sydney)

The Lives and Careers of Professional Live Streamers

Drawing on five years of ethnographic research, this seminar focuses on the pasts, presents and (predicted or considered futures of live streamers.

Thursday October 22, 3pm – 4.30pm

Justine Humphry and Chris Chesher (University of Sydney)

Smart Publics: Imaginaries and Discoveries of Smart Street Furniture

This talk will present research findings from the Smart Publics project focusing on smart city user imaginaries and public encounters with media hybridised forms of smart street furniture.

Thursday November 5, 3pm – 4.30pm

Alana Mann (University of Sydney)

Book release: Food in a Changing Climate

This new book analyses land and labour relationships in the global food system and considers whose knowledge counts in science communication on health and climate issues.

Thursday November 19, 3pm – 4.30pm

Olga Boichak (University of Sydney)

Mapping the National Web: Spaces and cultures of diasporic mobilisation in the digital age

This seminar explores hyperlinking behaviours among Ukrainian Canadians to map geographic, linguistic, and political boundaries of the Ukrainian national web.

Thursday November 26

Jolynna Sinanan (University of Sydney)

Larissa Hjorth (RMIT University)

Heather Horst (Western Sydney University)

Sarah Pink (Monash University)

Book release: Digital Media Practices in Households

This new book explores practices through locative media, self-tracking and quantified self apps in households in Tokyo, Shanghai and Melbourne.

Internet Freedom and Human Rights. European Policy Perspectives

Wednesday 19 May, 3.00pm – 4.30pm

MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

RSVP via Eventbrite

Internet Freedom and Human Rights. European Policy Perspectives

Internet freedom is considered as Human Right by some and as such in need for constitutional protection. Others consider freedom of speech as sufficient framework for internet freedom. The Council of Europe has released a Recommendation that discusses various forms of challenges to Human Rights in the internet realm, from personal data protection to an enabling environment for internet freedom. In this seminar this European perspective on internet regulation as a consequence of regarding internet freedom as a Human Right will be discussed.

Josef Trappel is Professor for media policy and media economics at the department for communication studies at the University of Salzburg, Austria. His scientific and research work concentrates on media and democracy, changes in mass media structures and their implications on mass communication, digitisation and innovation, national and international media policy and media economics. He is the convenor of the Euromedia Research Group and Director of the Erasmus+ Joint Master Programme “Digital Communication Leadership”. Recent publications include Digital media inequalities. Policies against divides, distrust and discrimination (Nordicom, 2019), Comparative Media Policy, Regulation and Governance in Europe. Unpacking the Policy Cycle (Intellect, 2018), European Media in Crisis. Values, Risks and Policies (Routledge 2015), The Media for Democracy Monitor (Nordicom, 2011), Media in Europe Today (Intellect, 2011).

Infrastructure, Technology and Values in the “Digital Silk Road”

Friday 29 May, 3.00pm – 4.30pm

MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

RSVP via Eventbrite

Software, hardware and apps built by tech companies are becoming the visible and invisible infra­structure underpinning the life of people, businesses, and institutions. Scholarship on this visible and invisible infrastructure and its increasing influence on daily life is focused on tech companies such as Facebook, Amazon, Google, and other US based companies. Meanwhile, Chinese tech companies have been quietly gaining users and market share outside their domestic boundaries. Alipay, part of the Chinese Alibaba Group, is the largest mobile payment platform in the world; Alibaba itself is a global provider of cloud services and e-commerce services; Tencent is the world’s biggest video game company; Huawei is building infrastruc­ture for broadband and mobile connectivity all around the world. Alongside the expansion of these compa­nies in global markets, the Chinese government has launched the “Digital Silk Road,” a part of its so-called “Belt and Road Initiative” (BRI) specifically focused on investments in digital technologies and infrastructure in countries that are part of its loosely reimagined Silk Road. Drawing from the initial stages of a research project that will take place in some of China’s neighboring countries in 2020-2025, this paper asks: what values and politics are built into the various components of the Digital Silk Road, and is – or how is – the internet they are creating fundamentally different from the current one? How do different technological “values” – some embedded in US technologies, and some in Chinese technologies – meet, clash or agree, and are reformed into new socio-technical systems in countries where they both co-exist?

Elisa Oreglia researches the adoption, adaptation and use of digital technologies in Asia, with a focus on China and Southeast Asia. She is interested in the localized socio-technical practices that emerge from technology users who are far from urban centers and advanced economies, as well as the political economy that surrounds technology development and circulation.

On the Grand Narrative of Media and Mass Communication Research

Wednesday 20 May, 3.00pm – 4.30pm

MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

RSVP via Eventbrite

In May 2020 the new, updated 7th edition of the seminal handbook McQuail’s Media and Mass Communication Theory will be published. The new edition of Denis McQuail’s (1935-2017) book opens up a debate on integrating, diversifying and globalizing the field of media studies and (mass) communication research.

For this 7th edition, Denis McQuail worked with Mark Deuze until his passing on the outline and structure of the book, after which Mark proceeded with carefully editing, updating and extending the text.

New to this edition:

  • A focus on reconceptualizing ‘mass’ media and communication and media theory in an age of big data, algorithmic culture, AI, platformization, streaming services, and mass self-communication.
  • Further discussion of the ethics of media and mass communication research.
  • Inclusion of a diverse and global range of voices, histories and examples from across the field, fully integrating social scientific and humanities-based perspectives and approaches.
  • More detailed attention to the way media industries work and what it is like to produce media professionally.
  • New and revised material, including a new chapter “A Canon of Media Effects”, helping the reader to rethink and reframe the whole idea of media effects and influence.

Mark Deuze is a Professor at the University of Amsterdam. From 2004 to 2013 he worked at Indiana University’s Department of Telecommunications in Bloomington, United States. Publications of his work include over ninety papers in academic journals and books. Deuze’s work has been translated in Chinese, Czech, German, Portuguese, Greek, and Hungarian. He holds a honorary appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Technology Sydney (2019-2023), has received a Donald W. Reynolds Fellowship from the Missouri School of Journalism (2015), a visiting Research Fellowship at the Center for International Communications Research of Leeds University (2007), and a Fulbright Fellowship at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles (2003). Weblog: deuze.blogspot.com. E-mail: mdeuze@uva.nl. Mark is also the bass player and singer of Skinflower (new recordings out in April 2020).

Digital Dances: Analysing Rhythmic Experience in Interaction Design

Wednesday April 22, 3.00pm – 4.30pm

MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

RSVP via Eventbrite

There are rhythms of action and response to all human-computer interactions. As we click, swipe, tap and sway to their beats, these rhythms intersect with the rhythms of our everyday lives. Perhaps they synchronize, perhaps they disrupt each other or maybe they dance together. Whatever their impact, our experience of these rhythms will colour our experience of an interaction design. Developing an understanding of rhythmic experience within an interaction design, requires a focus on methods that foreground temporal relationships, rhythmic flow and rhythmic performance. These methods involve iterative cycles of first-person experience and third person observation. They also involve the production and analysis of representations of rhythm across multiple sensory domains. Like rhythm itself, the focus is on change and continuity, on the cyclic and the linear, and on the patterns of their movement across time.

Brigid Costello is a lecturer and researcher in media production at the School of the Arts and Media at UNSW, Sydney. She has published on playful interaction design, user experience, evaluation methods, and videogames. She also creates interactive artworks and designs. In her recent book Rhythm, Play and Interaction Design (Springer, 2018), she explores the rhythmic dimensions of interaction design, developing practical strategies for designing and analysing playful rhythmic experience.

Sharing News Online – affective capitalism and the motivation to share

Friday 13 March, 3.00pm – 4.30pm

Seminar followed by book launch

MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

RSVP via Eventbrite

There is strong evidence that social media news sharing is influenced by people’s immediate feelings about an event or issue, their emotional investments in story sharing and their affective relations with their social networks.

However, it is also shaped by an industrial system of alerts, algorithms and analytics which gives visibility to content that is more likely to trigger strong participatory responses from media consumers. In this presentation, based on her new book with Associate Professor Tim Dwyer, Sharing News Online: Commendary Cultures & Social Media Ecologies, Dr Fiona Martin examines why the concept of affect is critical to understanding people’s everyday decisions to share information on social media platforms, and why Facebook’s ‘emotional contagion’ survey gives us only partial answers to how our feelings are ripe for manipulation online

Based on research conducted with Associate Professor Virginia Nightingale, she will investigate the cultural context and emotional triggers for news sharing, the news values that make stories shareworthy and the feelings that news evokes. In the talk, she’ll discuss the significant gender and age differences in the emotional states that prompt sharing behaviours, and trace clear affective trajectories in the types of stories shared and the intentions for exchanging them. Sharing News Online was the outcome of an ARC Linkage project (LP140100148) with Share Wars & Nine News.

Fiona Martin is senior lecturer in Online and Convergent Media, in the Dept. Media & Communications, at the University of Sydney. Her current ARC Discovery project is Platform Governance: Rethinking Internet Regulation as Media Policy (DP190100222), with Terry Flew, Nic Suzor, Tim Dwyer, Phil Napoli & Josef Trappel.

Tim Dwyer is Associate Professor in the Dept. Media & Communications, at the University of Sydney. He is author of Convergent Media and Privacy (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016) and a member of the Platform Governance team.

Virginia Nightingale was formerly Associate Professor in Media and Communication, University of Western Sydney. She retired in 2010, but came out of retirement to work on the Sharing News Online study.

Media@Sydney Seminar Series 2020, Semester 1

** Due to COVID-19 precautionary measures, we will not be hosting Media@Sydney Seminars until August. We thank you for your support and understanding and we hope to recommence later in the year. **

We are very pleased to announce our Semester 1 schedule for the 2020 Media@Sydney series. Events are usually held on Thursdays or Fridays in the John Woolley Building (A20) at the University of Sydney and are usually followed by light refreshments.

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Friday March 13: Sharing News Online: Affective Capitalism and the Motivation to Share – Fiona Martin, Tim Dwyer and Virginia Nightingale, University of Sydney

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Seminar followed by book launch

Wednesday April 22: Digital Dances: Analysing Rhythmic Experience in Interaction Design – Brigid Costello (UNSW) 

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Thursday April 30: Marie Palmer (UTS) 

3.00pm – 4.30pm, Woolley Common Room, N480, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Tuesday May 19: Internet Freedom and Human Rights. European Policy Perspectives – Josef Trappel, University of Salzburg

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Wednesday May 20: On the Grand Narrative of Media and Mass Communication Research – Mark Deuze (University of Amsterdam)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Wednesday May 27: ICA Pre-conference event: Digital Inequalities and Emerging Technologies

Co-hosted by ICA Divisions: Activism, Communication and Social Justice Interest Group; Communication and Technology Division

9.00am – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Thursday May 28: Andrea Guzman, Northern Illinois University 

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Friday May 29: Infrastructure, Technologies and Values in the “Digital Silk Road” – Elisa Oreglia, Kings College London 

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney