Automated Decision Making and Society – Julian Thomas

Friday 15 March, 2019, 3.00pm – 4.30pm

MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

RSVP via Eventbrite

Digital media industries are at the head of a new wave of automation, driven by an expanding array of intelligent technologies, from deep learning to blockchains. Automation promises great benefits, but concerns abound over the prospects of industry disruption, increasing inequality, declining productivity, and diminishing economic security. With the rapid expansion of automated decision making, new risks to human rights and welfare are emerging. This talk reviews current developments in automation, and considers the ways in which researchers in media studies may contribute to the emergence of ethical, responsible and inclusive automation.

Julian Thomas is Professor of Media and Communications at RMIT University. He leads the Technology, Communications and Policy Lab in RMIT’s Digital Ethnography Research Centre. Julian’s recent publications include Internet on the Outstation (INC, 2016), Measuring the Digital Divide (2016, 2017, 2018), The Informal Media Economy (Polity, 2015), and Fashioning Intellectual Property (Cambridge UP, 2012). He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities, and is actively involved in a wide range of consumer, research and policy organisations in the technology and communications sectors.

The Journalisms of Islam: Contending Views in Muslim Southeast Asia – Janet Steele

Monday 11 March 2019, 5.30 – 6.30pm

Quadrangle History Room S226, University of Sydney

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Join Janet Steele, author of Mediating Islam: Cosmopolitan Journalisms in Muslim Southeast Asia, for a seminar on Islamic journalism.

What is Islamic journalism? It depends on where you stand. In Indonesia or Malaysia, journalism and Islam can have many different faces.

At Sabili, an Indonesian Islamist magazine first established as an underground publication, journalists were hired for their ability
at dakwah, or Islamic propagation. At Tempo on the other hand, a weekly Indonesian news magazine that was banned by the Soeharto regime and returned to print in 1998, journalists don’t talk much
about sharia. Although many are pious and see their work as a manifestation of worship, the Islam they practice has been described as cosmopolitan, progressive, and even liberal. Does Islamic journalism require that reporters support an Islamic party as they do at Harakah newspaper in Malaysia? Or is it more important to practice the kind of substantial Islam promoted by the Indonesian newspaper Republika? What about Muslim journalists who work at secular news organization such as Malaysiakini?

Journalists at these five news organisations in one of the world’s most populous Muslim regions draw upon what are arguably universal principles of journalism, but understand and explain them through the lens of what I call an Islamic idiom. What they say about the meaning of their work suggests a richness of experience that has been overlooked by both scholars and those engaged in international affairs.

Janet Steele is an Associate Professor in the School of Media and Public Affairs at the George Washington University, and the director of the Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication.

This seminar is co-hosted by SSEAC and Media@Sydney, Department of Media and Communications.

Digital Rights in an Age of Surveillance AI

Thursday, 7 March, 2019, 4.30pm – 6.00pm

Seminar 2.03, RD Watt Building (A04), University of Sydney

RSVP via Eventbrite

Three leading researchers of artificial intelligence and its societal implications discuss how emerging AI technologies are affecting our digital rights, particularly in light of the increased use of machine learning in forms of surveillance and policing. In partnership with the Goethe Institute, the Department of Media and Communications welcomes you to this in-conversation event with:

Professor Melvin Chen(Nanyang Technological University, Singapore), is a philosopher of artificial intelligence and researcher in creative cognition research, ethics, metaethics and aesthetics. He is a member of the ‘AI for Humanity’ initiative, and is interested in the cross-cultural negotiation of issues such as the ethics and governance of AI, and the role of education in an AI-driven age.

Dr Theresa Züger (Humboldt University, Germany) is Head of the Office for the Third Engagement Report at the Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society and a researcher of digital forms of civil disobedience. In 2017, Theresa was a research fellow at the Center for Advanced Internet Studies with her project Polynocular Tech Lab. She is co-founder of Bridge Figures, an organisation countering xenophobia with digital strategies. She tweets @thezueger

Mr Karaitiana Taiuru (Christchurch, New Zealand) is a long-time advocate of digital Māori rights and a researcher of data sovereignty and digital colonialism, te reo Māori revitalisation with technology, Māori representation and intellectual property rights. His PhD research examines the ways in which genome sequencing technologies perpetuate institutional racism and racial stereotyping.

Media@Sydney Seminar Series 2019, Semester 1

We are very pleased to announce our Semester 1 schedule for the 2019 Media@Sydney series. Events are usually held on Fridays in the John Woolley Building (A20) at the University of Sydney and Friday seminars are usually followed by informal drinks.

Click here to join our mailing list!

Thursday 7 March: Digital Rights in an Age of Surveillance AI – Melvin Chen (Nanyang Technological University), Theresa Züger (Humboldt University) and Karaitiana Tairu (Christchurch)

co-hosted by the Goethe Institute*

4:30 pm – 6:00 pm, Seminar 2.03, RD Watt Building (A04), University of Sydney

Monday 11 March: The Journalism of Islam: Contenting Views in Muslim Southeast Asia – Janet Steele (George Washington University)

co-hosted at SSEAC*

5.30pm – 6.30pm, Quadrangle History Room S226, University of Sydney

Friday 15 March: Automated Decision Making and Society – Julian Thomas (RMIT University)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Friday 29 March: De-/Re-Constructing home: Notions of home and homelessness in times of mobile media – Maren Hartmann (University of Arts, Berlin)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Discussant: Justine Humphry

Tuesday 2 April: Communicative Reflexivity and Financial Bubbles: Linking Minsky to Marx – Peter Thompson, Victoria University of Wellington

3.00pm – 4.30pm, Seminar Room 2.03, RD Watt Building A04, University of Sydney*

Friday 5 April: Media, Context and the Shaping of Contemporary Movements across de Atlantic – Marta Vilar Rosales (University of Lisbon)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Friday 12 April: “All that Glitters is not Gold”: Digital Media and Adolescents’ Political Engagement – Jörg Matthes (University of Vienna)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Friday 3 May: Digital Media and Online Learning: A comparative perspective from the Pacific and the Caribbean Heather Horst (University of Sydney), Jolynna Sinanan (University of Sydney), Fulori Manoa (University of the South Pacific) and Sheba Mohammid (RMIT University)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Friday 10 May: Automating the Social: Digital Futures for Welfare, Disability, Social, and Health ServicesPaul Henman (University of Queensland), El Gibbs (People with Disability Australia), Leanne Dowse (University of New South Wales), Wayne Hawkins (Australian Communications Consumer Action Network) and Gerard Goggin (University of Sydney)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Tuesday May 14: Myths, Mistakes, and #FakeNews: A Historical PerspectiveMichael Socolow (University of Maine)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney*

Discussant: Margaret Van Heekeren

co-hosted by the Centre for Media History (Macquarie University)

Friday 17 May: Voice and Participation in Global Food PoliticsAlana Mann (University of Sydney)

3.00pm –5.00pm, The Forest Lodge Hotel, 117 Arundel St, Forest Lodge

*Seminar followed by Book Launch

co-hosted by Sydney Environment Institute

Friday 31 May: No seminar, ICA conference

Tuesday 12 June: Beyond Anthropomorphism Symposium: Day 1

6.00pm – 7.30pm, SSB Lecture Theatre 200, Social Sciences Building, University of Sydney*

co-hosted by University of Sydney Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Systems and Sydney Ideas

Wednesday 12 June: Beyond Anthropomorphism Symposium: Day 2

9.00am – 5.40pm, Lecture Theatre 1130, Abercrombie Business School Building, University of Sydney*

co-hosted by University of Sydney Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Systems and University of Sydney Business School

Friday 14 June: How Pet Care Scenarios Can Disrupt Energy Futures – Yolande Strengers (Monash University)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building

*Special time or location

Digital Publics: Hidden and Untraceable Data

When: Monday 3 December, 2018 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Where: Philosophy Room S249, Philosophy Room S249, University of Sydney Camperdown, NSW 2006

Part of this year’s Digital Humanities Downunder Summer Institute, co-hosted with Western Sydney University, The Department of Media and Communications, The University of Sydney.

Register here

Human-machine communication is increasingly embedded in our everyday lives through the rise of social media, the Internet of Things (IoT), linked data, and so-called smart technologies such as connected homes, smart cars, and digital assistants. As our use of these technologies continues to grow and integrate with our personal lives, the early promise of machines increasing user communication and participation, seems to have faded towards a world where humans primarily only communicate with machines and must participate or risk being excluded. These integrated and connected processes of human-machine communication are increasingly less visible overtime as they become embedded in platforms, sensors and autonomous systems, while the obvious concern for citizens is an increase of user tracking and surveillance. What is of greater concern, and often underexplored, is our ability to, as James W. Carey (2005) notes, disentangle the consequences of entangled connected devices from the wider world of power and ambition. Understanding this critical ambition should be the role of citizens, who inform and are guided by leading public figures in these arenas.

This is precisely the role researchers from the Humanities, Social Sciences and Human-Computer Interaction disciplines should be engaging in. However, in a post-Cambridge Analytica world, gaining access to these sorts of environments for research and critical examination is increasingly difficult. This is a critical moment for expertise from a number of areas to collaboratively design and employ new approaches towards digital research methods, that can inform and work with publics, advise policy makers, and guide appropriate best practice for users of human-machine communication environments.

To explore this area, we have a panel of leading experts discussing the current and emerging themes of human-machine communication, who will apply their critical lens to this increasingly important area for citizens.

Professor Jean Burgess, Director of the Digital Media Research Centre
Professor Michele Willson, Dean of Research for Faculty of Humanities and Professor, Internet Studies, Curtin University
Dr Aim Sinpeng, Lecturer University of Sydney

Dr Jonathon Hutchinson, Lecturer University of Sydney, and Dr Justine Humphry, Lecturer University of Sydney, will be the discussants for the evening.

Register here

Media@Sydney Seminar Series, Semester 2

We are very pleased to announce our Semester 2 schedule for the  2018 Media@Sydney series in 2018. Events will be held in the John Woolley Building (A20) at the University of Sydney and will be followed by informal drinks.

Click here to join our mailing list!

Friday 3 August: Reporting Elections: Rethinking the Logic of Campaign Coverage – Dr. Stephen Cushion (Cardiff University)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Friday 17 August: The Moral Economy of Mobile Phones Symposium and Book Launch – Prof. Heather Horst (University of Sydney), Prof. Robert Foster (University of Rochester), Lucas Watt (RMIT University), Wendy Bai Magea (University of Goroka), Romitesh Kant (LaTrobe University/University of the South Pacific), and Dr. lucas gaspard (RMIT University)

3.00pm – 5.30pm*, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Friday 24 August: Gatewatching and News Curation: Journalism and Social Media – Axel Bruns (University of Queensland)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Tuesday 28 August: Custodians of the Internet: Platforms, Content Moderation, and the Hidden Decisions that Shape Social Media – Tarleton Gillespie (Microsoft Research)

4.00pm – 6.00pm* John Woolley Common Room, N480, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Friday 31 August: No Seminar – 4S Conference in Sydney

Friday 14 September: Life in Antarctica: mediations, speculations, ethnographies – Juan Francisco Salazar (Western Sydney University)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Friday 21 September: This changes everything! What “the digital” means for the purposes and practices of education – Julian Sefton-Green (Deakin University)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building A20, University of Sydney

Friday 5 October: Digital Housekeeping: Living with Data – Heather Horst (University of Sydney) and Jolynna Sinanan (University of Sydney) and 

Oversharing, Normative Intimacy, and Gender in ‘Digital Intimate Publics – Amy Dobson (Curtin University)

as part of the Gender and Cultural Studies Seminar Series*, 2.00pm – 4.00pm, The Refectory, Main Quadrangle, University of Sydney 

Friday 12 October: Political Participation on Social, Civic and Computer Networks Francesco Bailo (University of Sydney)

3.00pm – 4.30pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building

Monday 5 November: Climate Change and the Media: Discussion and Book Launch – Benedetta Brevini (University of Sydney) and Justin Lewis (Cardiff University

In partnership with the Sydney Environment Institute*

Discussion: 5.00pm – 6.30pm, Law School Foyer, New Law School, followed by Book Launch: 6.30pm – 8.00pm, Law Lounge, Level 1, New Law School

Friday 5 November:  Design Ethics and the  Age of Conversational Systems – Panel Discussion with Rafael Calvo (University of Sydney), Jean-Claude Martin (Université Paris Sud, France ), Virginia Dignum (Umeå University, Sweden) and Nick Enfield (University of Sydney), Moderated by Gerard Goggin (University of Sydney)

3.30pm – 5.00pm, MECO Seminar Room, S226, John Woolley Building*

*Special time or location